Whirlwind Week

It is Thursday evening, and my week feels like it has flown by. Monday, we had no students at school, but needed to be there for an in-service and department meetings. The in-service was amazing. Uncommon Seminars came to lead us in activities designed to help us in our communications with each other. Eventually, our school is hoping to develop a system of teacher, staff, and student support that would resemble the house systems at other schools. To do that, though, our faculty and staff need to learn how to dialogue far more honestly with each other. The folks from Uncommon Seminars helped us take the first steps on that path (and we had a blast doing it). Then, we all got to go to three hours of intense department meetings. Needless to say, I was exhausted by the end of the day, but I still needed to get my daughter home from her school, and I need to get my MacBook Pro into the Genius Bar. Tuesday and Wednesday were crazy because we are beginning research essays on human rights topics. So, between bombarding our students with information and trying to help fourteen and fifteen year old students sort through horrific global issues, I found myself leaving school both days with little to no energy. But, neither day ended with the close of school. On Tuesday, my parents, my wife, and I attended our daughter’s band performance with the combined advanced band and jazz band. Students from various grade schools come together each year to rehearse for weeks to perform this concert. It was great, and I love that my parents got to see her perform, but my brain was turning to mush before we ever got to the concert. Then, on Wednesday evening, all of us had dinner together. The food was fantastic (we ate at The Happy Gnome in Saint Paul), but again, after repeated full days, a three hour dinner with my family does not leave me much room for recovery. Today, I had to get to school far earlier than normal because I was assisting with the young men’s retreat for our eleventh graders. The event was outstanding, but it was another full day. Plus, I had to grade students making up presentations when I got back to school after the retreat. At one level, I am thrilled that tomorrow is Friday, but I also find myself shocked that I still have one more day to go before the week ends. I will get through tomorrow; I just do not know where I will find the energy to do it.

Making things even tougher are a number of sad (and infuriating) pieces of news in my life. Topping the list, my father-in-law is in the hospital again. He has been battling a number of medical issues for years, with the worst three being sleep apnea, type II diabetes, and Parkinson’s disease. But recently, things have gotten worse,  and he is having problems with strange infections that are requiring hospitalization. Beyond that, three different colleagues at work have gotten serious medical things happening. One woman is being placed on extreme bed rest for her pregnancy. Everything should be fine, but still, for a woman to be on bed rest at 31 weeks is a tough situation. Then, another female colleague is having a hysterectomy. And, a third colleague is facing a spinal tumor that is most likely not cancerous, but may eventual confine her to a wheelchair. Far down the scale of serious (yet still frustrating), a friend at work who I am hoping to teach with again is having ridiculous pressure put on her to rush some significant life choices. And, I just learned through the REM Runner blog that the Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case on “ministerial exception” involving a Lutheran school that fired a teacher with narcolepsy in 2005. The school is asking the Supreme Court to rule on whether the “ministerial exception” applies to a teacher who the school has designated a “minister.” The ruling is important because if the “ministerial exception” does apply that teacher cannot sue the school under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Although I feel quite safe in my current situation, the case hits far too close to home. Anyone interested should definitely head over to REM Runner (because she provides far better clarity to the case than I could ever hope to do).

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3 Comments

Filed under Confusion, Education, Emotions, Empathy, Exhaustion, Family, Friends, Frustration, Gratitude, Honesty, Illness, Narcolepsy

3 responses to “Whirlwind Week

  1. Hi there… so fantastic to read to writings of a fellow teacher with narcolepsy!! I would love it if you could add my site to your blogroll, I’ve already mentioned yours in my latest post (I hope you don’t mind). Thanks for sharing your story!

  2. Les K

    Has your father-in-law ever received any types of treatment for his sleep apnea? The research seems to give some pretty positive reviews of (CPAP) continuous positive airway pressure therapy.
    http://www.dailyrx.com/news-article/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-therapy-improves-sleep-apnea-13723.html

    What did the Dr.’s recommend for him?

  3. Thank you for your blog. I wish I had looked for similar blogs when my husband was alive. I acquired narcolepsy when in his mid 40s. I died last year at 73 from lung cancer.

    I recently create a lens (http://www.squidoo.com/workshop/living-with-a-narcoleptic) and wanted to find ways to share. If you allow it to be done here, I appreciate you doing so. If not, I understand.

    I felt I needed to share what I could about living with someone who had narcolepsy and my observations. The worst for Bruce was trying to control his emotions when out in public. I commend you for your site, here, and for sharing your disorder with the world. I would be interested in knowing at what age you acquired narcolepsy. My husband struggled with it and trying to make a living. However, as I look back, acquiring it at around the age of 43 was only difficult because he was not the type of person who was disciplined. If he had been, I do believe he could have done better. He was very smart and self-educated so I know that was not a problem.

    I will look further into this blog and see if I can acquire more knowledge that I can share with others and will recommend they stop by and visit.

    Thank you for your time,
    Sandy

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